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Which update would you recommend for a better Speed index?

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  • Which update would you recommend for a better Speed index?

    My server's specifications are as follows:
    Mainboard - CPU: Xeon E3-1230v3 @ 3.30GHz, Memory: DDR3 1600MHz 16GB X10SLL (2x 8GB)
    (Disc 1) Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD
    (Disc 2) Samsung 850 EVO 250GB SSD
    RAID - mdadm RAID 1, OS - CentOS 7, cPanel - DirectAdmin is free
    Current Bandwidth 40TB (1Gbit)

  • #2
    My Speed Index is a little below low. To improve the Speed Index, I'd like to know which hardware needs to be upgraded.

    The best thing you can do is upgrade to the most up-to-date hardware available. In terms of machine refresh timeframes, the CPU you have was developed in 2015, which is 6 years or one lifecycle ago.

    To see what comes inside your budget, check at modern processors and their speeds. Upgrade from CentOS 7 to Ubuntu, Debian, or another Linux distribution with NVMe drives. They are used by DirectAdmin.

    Consider employing a fast CDN to provide specific files. Consider caching database requests with Redis and optimizing or clustering your database server.


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    • #3
      You may upgrade to a newer CPU with a clock speed of 4GHz or higher that supports DDR4. Additionally, an NVMe SSD will boost performance.

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      • #4
        A newer system with NVMe will help a bit for you along with a newer system

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        • #5
          Though replacing old hardware with newer will certainly cure the problem, you could also be throwing hardware at a problem that isn't hardware-related. Getting the fastest CPU, for example, won't help if you're frequently out of memory and have to use swap (disk-based) RAM, or if you're hitting IO drive throughput limits or both, or if you're sending more data than the network card can handle.
          As a result, you must consider what is causing the sluggishness: Is it simply ancient hardware in general? Is it because the CPU is always at 100%? Is it possible that RAM is being consumed, producing heavy IO and slow file reads?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Emma Taylor View Post
            Though replacing old hardware with newer will certainly cure the problem, you could also be throwing hardware at a problem that isn't hardware-related. Getting the fastest CPU, for example, won't help if you're frequently out of memory and have to use swap (disk-based) RAM, or if you're hitting IO drive throughput limits or both, or if you're sending more data than the network card can handle.
            As a result, you must consider what is causing the sluggishness: Is it simply ancient hardware in general? Is it because the CPU is always at 100%? Is it possible that RAM is being consumed, producing heavy IO and slow file reads?
            All of this is true, but given the current state of hardware versus the cost of skilled administrators, it's definitely cheaper to upgrade everything at once:
            • Upgrade to a CPU with 16 or more cores.
            • Upgrade to 64GB or more RAM and 2x NVMe SSDs in SW RAID 1
            For any piece of equipment that may be limiting performance, this will do 4x or better.
            If you hire someone to figure out where your performance is weak, they will almost certainly offer the same upgrades at the conclusion of the process, so why bother? It's better to go the other way around and upgrade those items first, then get someone to check into it if the performance is still insufficient.

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