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What is SSH?

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  • What is SSH?

    Can anyone help me and tell me what is SSH and why do we need SSH?

  • #2
    Secure Shell or Secure Socket Shell is known as SSH, It is a network protocol that allows users, especially system administrators, to access a computer across an insecure network in a secure manner.

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    • #3
      I have something which might you help you to know about SSH, SSH can also be used to construct secure tunnels for other application protocols, such as running X Window System graphical sessions safely from a remote location. By default, an SSH server listens on port 22 of the Transmission Control Protocol (TCP)

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      • #4
        -The Secure Shell Protocol is a cryptographic network protocol for operating network services securely over an unsecured network. Its most notable applications are remote login and command-line execution. SSH applications are based on a client-server architecture, connecting an SSH client instance with an SSH server.

        -A network protocol that enables secure remote connections between two systems. System admins use SSH utilities to manage machines, copy, or move files between systems. Because SSH transmits data over encrypted channels, security is at a high level.

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        • #5
          Hello Chris,

          To answer your question of What is SSH?


          SSH or Secure Shell is a network communication protocol that enables two computers to communicate (c.f HTTP or hypertext transfer protocol, which is the protocol used to transfer hypertext such as web pages) and share data. An inherent feature of ssh is that the communication between the two computers is encrypted meaning that it is suitable for use on insecure networks.

          SSH is often used to "log in" and perform operations on remote computers but it may also be used for transferring data.

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          • #6
            An SSL certificate is a digital certificate that verifies the identity of a website and allows for a secure connection. Secure Sockets Layer (SSL) is a security protocol that creates an encrypted connection between a web server and a web browser.
            SSL certificates must be placed on a company's or organization's website to safeguard online transactions and keep customer information private and secure.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Daniel_Brown View Post
              Secure Shell or Secure Socket Shell is known as SSH, It is a network protocol that allows users, especially system administrators, to access a computer across an insecure network in a secure manner.
              Yes Daniel is right and SSH is useful to your website also.

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              • #8
                – In todays’ world, SSH is included by default with every Unix, Linux, and Mac server in every data center. Many various forms of interactions between a local workstation and a remote host have been secured using SSH connections, including secure remote access to resources, remote execution of commands, delivery of software patches and updates, and other administrative or management duties

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                • #9
                  The following are some of the features that SSH provides:
                  • secure remote access for users and automated processes to SSH-enabled network systems or devices;
                  • secure remote access for users and automated processes to SSH-enabled network systems or devices;
                  • secure and interactive file transfer sessions;
                  • automated and secured file transfers; secure issuance of commands on distant devices or systems
                  • secure administration of network infrastructure components

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                  • #10
                    Oh, thank you so much to everyone for explaining to me what is SSH and how it works.

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